Info bites. Some little known. Others blindingly obvious. But all useful.

In this blog:-

  • Does your site accommodate Mobile visitors?
  • What does position in Google search results mean to your click through rate? Does it really matter?
  • Is your site fast or slow and does it matter?
  • Do people read what you have written?
  • Does it matter if content is  ‘below the fold’?
  • Bounce Rate. What’s that and does it matter?
  • Quick tip.
  • Some useful links


Does your site accommodate Mobile visitors?

Mobile use of the web is growing faster than the initial web take up in the 90’s; accounting now for around 50% of web usage. At first that may seem surprising but when you consider the options now available for web browsing; smart phones, TV’s and tablets, it should come as no surprise at all.

Check your analytic software to see what level of mobile visitors you have. And ask yourself are you ready?

n.b. If your site is not accommodating mobile visitors, that’s a major failing.

What does your position in the Google search results mean to your click through rate? Does it really matter?

We all strive to be in the number 1 spot in search results but what if we don’t achieve it? What affect does that have on the traffic from the search results?

The difference between First at 42.13% and second at 11.9% shows just how important it is for your link to be number 1 on that topic. Other results are shown on this pie chart. (I’m not quite sure the percentages stack up with the ranking but despite this the indication is clear.)

Source. http://www.blogstorm.co.uk/google-organic-seo-click-through-rates/

Moral of the story… strive for number 1 spot.

Is your site fast or slow and does it matter?

Some would argue that for a local government site this isn’t as important as for a commercial site where there is competition. The argument being it’s better to deliver good and complete information than it is to be just ‘quick’, and to risk the possibility of inferior or incomplete information.A reasonable argument, however, fast sites are another issue to be  considered in customer service evaluations. Indeed Google downgrades sites in it’s rankings if the pages are slow i.e. over 2 seconds.

For commercial sites the faster the pages load the better the conversion.  A one second speeding up of the page load adds 7% to conversion. So speed is important to our clients.

Do people read what you have written?

My experience of dealing with internal clients showed brevity was not their strong point.

Huge amounts of pointless data, some of which is just ego massaging, is being displayed on web pages. And it goes unread by clients – and that’s who we are trying to satisfy (not the manager of a particular section who wants to tell the world how great he or his team is).

Sadly people don’t read web pages in the way the writers would believe or even hope. They scan for keywords and skim around those. Rarely if ever do they read long text, especially if it’s about you, the council.

Dross and flannel. Skim off the dross and throw out the flannel. Froth and bubble. Scrape off  the froth and prick all the bubbles. It’s just so much pointless verbiage that gets in the way. Cut to the chase and provide the data.

Put yourself in the clients place and say ”what’s in it for me”. Evaluate all your content that way and remember the average reading age for web users is 14 (maybe higher for local government pages because of the market sector but dont assume high levels of literacy for your readers) so keep it simple.

If you want to test some pages to see if you really are interested in customers,  go here… www.futurenowinc.com/wewe.htm put in a url for a page to test whether that’s so.

Does it matter if content is  ‘below the fold’?

75% of clicks occur without people scrolling down! Blimey that’s going to come of bit of a surprise to those 10 page scrollers on some local government sites.

You can test your site to see just how many people can see what parts of your site. Go to  www.foldtester.com to see how much of your page is below the fold and is therefore unseen and by what portion of visitors.

Bounce Rate. What’s that and does it matter?

Bounce rate is loosely the percentage of people who view your site, or a single page if you are set up that way, for whom the landing page is also the exit page i.e. they go nowhere else.Your site did not interest them enough to induce them to dig deeper or browse.

Now this may be entirely appropriate. e.g. you may hav e provided a link to a page with a specific piece of information for a specific set of people. They look at that page and ‘job done’ off they go somewhere else. However, generally, if your bounce rate is above 40% – that’s a sort of average in commerce – then something is wrong.

High bounce rate has been crudely likened to “I came, I saw, I puked.” Graphically cruel but accurate and we’ve all done it.

Quick tip.

Pages with forms embedded deliver better results than those with a link to a form.

What does this mean? Say you had a page where you wanted clients to register to a newsletter. Don’t link out to a complex form requiring a large to medium number of fields to be completed. Put a small form in the top right of the request page with something like…

Register here to receive hot news.

And construct a small form in that box to do just that.

BTW incentives to register i.e. free swim at the local baths etc really lift the percentage of registrations.

Some useful links

This site provides really useful information.

http://www.websiteoptimization.com/speed/tweak/clickstream/

Browser testing

http://browsershots.org/ Tests you site on a number of browsers

Uptime and link testing.

http://www.pingdom.com/   Tests web uptime and performance for your site.

http://home.snafu.de/tilman/xenulink.html Xenu Link Sleuth. Tests the links on your site.

A/B & Multivariate Testing

http://unbounce.com/ constructs alternative landing pages and provides stats too.

www.google.com/websiteoptimizer does what it says.

Visitor tracking

http://www.clicktale.com/ constructs heat maps of visitor interactions with your site.

http://www.crazyegg.com/ visualise where your visitors are going.

Usability testing

http://www.usertesting.com/ Does what it says.

http://whatusersdo.com/  Usability and user experience testing.

User surveys and feedback

http://www.surveymonkey.com/  Carry out surveys. I’ve used this in the past and found it to be excellent.

http://kissinsights.com/  Feedback from your site.

http://www.4qsurvey.com/ on line survey tool. Free for 15 days.

About the author.

Peter Barton was the Head of Service for “Web and Information Governance” at Lincolnshire County Council until December 2010.

Peter introduced many innovative elements into Local Government Web sites many of which have since become commonplace. Advertising for instance.

Peter’s background, prior to Local Government web site production  was in commerce where he started and ran a successful design business for many years. Peter has been involved in web site production since 1992 building the first sites in hand written code.

Peter’s business is a commercial venture  in on-line retail. Quite a departure form local government but a departure which has involved learning about the otherwise hidden intricacies of the web again. This time with a commercial eye. What he now has is a commercially augmented experience of local government web production.  And that’s refreshing and useful.

Peter also provides consultancy to Local Government organisations on all things web.


Contact details:


Peter Barton

T:  +44 (0) 1522-878135

M: +44 (0) 7712-578596

E: peterdbarton@gmail.com

Skype: V70PDB

Twitter: @lgwebman – Tweets about local government web stuff

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I said I wouldn’t but, oh dear.

Socitm  are talking about the next Better Connected being ”top tasks” related.

I suppose telling us what is going to be measured next year is a step forward from past years. They usually spring their  surprise of ‘something new’ on  unsuspecting local government web teams after the BC review and then tell us what we should have done and question why we didn’t. Doh!

Is this ‘helpful’ shift just that, or is it a cynical ruse to get more LG cash into what are allegedly ever shrinking coffers over there in Socitm land.

Rumours, and that’s all they are, abound about diminishing membership at Socitm. I suppose given the shrinking Local Government pound it’s inevitable. Discovering whether these rumours are true is difficult at best. It was nigh on impossible to get information out of Socitm when they camouflaged themselves with a .gov.uk extension to their name (despite submitting FOI’s)  so there is no chance now that they are fully fledged and overtly, commercial. That aside the potential to top up the turnover, by offering paid for seminars on the up coming Better Connected top task agenda, is a chance too good to miss.

In a recent blog by Simon Wakeman  headed “Shabby PR from Socitm’ a comment was made by an anonymous respondent.

Blog by Simon WakemanWhoever is behind that eponymous and anonymous David Jones comment on the Simon Wakeman blog here… hits the nail on the head and goes beyond the topic of Simon’s blog, which was related to Cookies. David Jones says:-

  • “Who appointed Socitm as having the last word in what a council website should or shouldn’t look like, do, have as its content, or even where in the council structure the webteam should sit?”
  • ….what they write in their reviews are all just personal opinions, not objective facts about how the site should be.”
  • “And different reviewers come up with different opinions – one reviewer fails a website because of the location of the A-Z index, whilst another reviewer passes a different website on its A-Z index in exactly the same location!”
  • “Are the council webteams which all diligently obey their Socitm overlords going to get four stars, whilst the councils which are implementing their website according to their own needs going to struggle to even get two?”
  • And he finishes with…“Will this madness ever end?”

Bravo! Well observed and elegantly put.

My experience of taking issues with Socitm and one of their suppliers whilst at Lincolnshire County Council showed  that comment was futile and to no avail. Those blue rinse ladies are not for turning, particularly the cloth eared Mr Greenwood who sees himself as the grand panjandrum on local government web sites. A comment given to me by a less guarded BC reviewer showed the sway Mr Greenwood has on the review.

Are Socitm simply critics or can they cut the mustard when it comes to web sites?
Lets not talk about the Socitm web site as it is now, or even as it was just a couple of years ago. That’s not what we should judge them on. Suffice to say they have never been good at leading by example.

So what should we judge them on? Consistency in measurment is what they should be judged on. David Jones highlights Socitms inadequacies at getting any consistency in what they do…

“And different reviewers come up with different opinions – one reviewer fails a website because of the location of the A-Z index, whilst another reviewer passes a different website on its A-Z index in exactly the same location!”

And that has certainly been my experience.

Better than nothing. Now there’s an accolade.
And yet…yes, I’ll give it to Socitm, Better Connected is better than nothing – after all there is little else.  But to pay so much attention to what is an inconsistent hodgepodge of disparate and subjective opinions from a group of individuals, some of whom actually run web sites for Councils is akin to believing in  the curative properties of snake oil .

Continuing on that theme; if reviewers also run council web sites they cannot be unbiased. Of course if they are web managers, and some are, and they are expert at judging web sites –and if not why are they Socitm reviewers – why aren’t  their own web sites marvelous?  None of it stacks up.
Better Connected is not a measuring process. It’s a finger in the air stab at something solid and meaningful. Not to mention the two fingers in the air to Socitm’s clients.

Some would say you only have yourselves to blame. People do not gather together to make their dislike of the Better Connected review known and they should. There is no community outcry. Why? Perhaps for the very reason the person behind David Jones mentions in his piece…

“I am, of course, posting pseudonymously because I work on a local authority webteam, and do not wish our rating for Better Connected 2012 to be harmed by anything which the Socitm spies might have read here.”

The sad thing is I believe Socitm will be heartened by a comment like that.

Is there life outside of Better Connected?
I am aware there are many who think as I do. They don’t like  the inconsistencies in  Better Connected or even what it stands for let alone the rank commercialism hidden behind the faux objectivity. Each time I spoke at or attended conferences or meetings many voiced this opinion and asked why we slavishly followed Socitm’s view.

Many particularly dislike the practice of sending reports to Directors who may be ill informed, or worse still, Councillors, many of whom have little or no understanding of the technical slant to the report nor of Socitm’s commercial push behind it. And less still of what is achievable within a large knowledge based organisation. And of course many people dislike the contemptuous use of tabloid spun headlines put out by the Socitm comms people. It’s all a bit tacky don’t you think?.
Some years ago I decided in Lincolnshire to ignore what Better Connected said. We chose to ask what our external clients want from us and concern ourselves with how we could achieve that with the information we could get from our internal clients. We didn’t value the opinions of a team of self appointed ‘experts’ with whom we disagreed. I was prepared to argue the point internally and take the flack for it. I made that opinion clear to all. Unsurprisingly we slid in Better Connected rankings. Much as we did in the Sitemorse rankings when we stopped paying them.

Web site of the year awardAnd yet despite this Lincolnshire County Council’s web site was voted Best  Government web site of the year 2011. See here…
So despite not playing Socitm’s game it seems LCC did OK. Complaints from customers reduced with there being practically none about the navigation and the ability to get to information. That in itself was a minor miracle.

And finally.
During a conversation about contradictory comments from the reviewers of our A-Z in consecutive BC reports; when asked why we had been marked down in the second for doing what was suggested in the first, Martin Greenwood said Better Connected was not a document to be followed slavishly. My reply was “then why make the comments in the first place if they are not there to be taken heed of”?
Remind me. What’s the purpose of Better Connected? Barmy, just barmy.

And remember, if Socitm and Better Connected was the all seeing oracle then their report, should you follow it, would ensure your site would be perfect. Wouldn’t that be, commercially speaking, like sawing off the branch they are sitting on? Of course it would which is why it is neither the oracle nor is it necessarily correct in its assertions. And if that’s the case…

Why don’t you see what you can achieve by talking to your clients, if you don’t already, and providing what they want – even if the results don’t agree with Socitm.

After all, who are you building your site for; a set of biased and opinionated Better Connected reviewers or somebody who really uses your site and wants information?

Listen to your clients. Listen to your real critics.

It really is your choice.

To see more on these issues search this site using the phrase ‘Socitm’

And Finally, finally.

After this little trot on my pet hobby horse I’ll put it back in the stable and return to a more sanguine level of comment with upcoming articles on Google analytics, e-mail marketing for local government and the use of Facebook in local government – though not necessarily in that order.

About the author.

Peter Barton was the Head of Service for “Web and Information Governance” at Lincolnshire County Council until December 2010.

Peter introduced many innovative elements into Local Government Web sites many of which have since become commonplace. Advertising for instance.

Peter’s background, prior to Local Government web site production  was in commerce where he started and ran a successful design business for many years. Peter has been involved in web site production since 1992 building the first sites in hand written code.

Peter’s business is a commercial venture  in on-line retail. Quite a departure form local government but a departure which has involved learning about the otherwise hidden intricacies of the web again. This time with a commercial eye. What he now has is a commercially augmented experience of local government web production.  And that’s refreshing and useful.

Peter also provides consultancy to Local Government on all things web.

Contact details:

T:  +44 (0) 1522-878135

M: +44 (0) 7712-578596

E: peterdbarton@gmail.com

Skype: V70PDB

Twitter: @lgwebman – Tweets about local government web stuff

Search Engine Optimisation for Local Government Web sites.

Why do we need to know about Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)?

Being in local government you may suppose SEO is of no interest to you. After all, your ‘clients’ are going to come to your site because in your area you are the monopoly provider of  many services; libraries, schools, social care, road repairs etc.

Whilst that’s partly true, in the move towards digital delivery in this ever growing on-line world, providing better access to your data by search engines should be seen as providing better customer service. Besides you must have had internal clients asking why their data is not “first in Google”. SEO is therefore important to you.

What search engines should you optimise for?

  • Currently ( researched in June 2011) 90% of UK searches are carried on Google property.
  • Bing have 4.2% of the market
  • Yahoo have 2.5%

And ASK, though not really a search engine anymore, has 1.2%.

So in the UK there is really one important search to enable and that is of course Google.

Abroad, in Russia, China etc there are many more search engines , some more important than Google in their own country. In the unlikely event you need to be generally seen in other countries – maybe some pages for economic development would be of use but only if they are in the language of the country – then you need to consider how you can utilise SEO for those pages of your site.

What’s happening at Google?

Google is turning into something more than just a search. I cant pretend to know or understand where Google are going. All I can do is see what comes out of Google and think about where that may lead.

We have already seen other Google services; Google Earth, Google Maps , Google+ and much, much more but are you aware there is a shopping experience on Google? It’s not wonderfully obvious, or for that matter, relevant to local government, unless you have products to sell, but the next time you do a search for a product of some sort have a look at the left hand column in the search results. You’ll see ‘shopping’. Go take a look at the results. The supplier has to opt into this service by providing a spreadsheet with agreed content in set columns. You can start to see where Google is going here.

Panda

Panda is the name for a series of changes to Google’s search algorithms, which were put in place in February of 2011, affecting the UK last April. It’s worth emphasising this is a change to Google’s algorithms. It’s not a black list of any sort. Panda algorithm modification is the biggest change Google have made in their history.

Panda changed the world for many people. The main change was the downgrading of sites connected to sites known as “Link farms” or “content farms”( a site which hosts many links and usually trite content about a site or URL). Being connected to by link/content farms is seen as detrimental and many sites were downgraded, some losing as much as 99.9% of their visibility in search results..

You can see an article here on the winners and losers in the Panda re-shuffle. Panda is unlikely to have an effect on local government or even small business visibility.

What is Google looking at on your site in order to define your position in their rankings?

Before you start.

Get the word from the mouth of Google-god. Google provide a really helpful, no, ESSENTIAL,  guide on SEO in pdf form here ..

Download this document to get an insight into just what it is Google want from your site.

Note.
Take heed of the contents of this document. It’s  ‘the 10 commandments’ for your Google-life.

It covers…

  • Create unique, accurate page titles
  • Make use of the “description” meta tag
  • Improving Site Structure
  • Improve the structure of your URLs
  • Make your site easier to navigate
  • Optimizing Content
  • Offer quality content and services
  • Write better anchor text
  • Optimize your use of images
  • Use heading tags appropriately
  • Dealing with Crawlers
  • Make effective use of robots.txt
  • Be aware of rel=”nofollow” for links
  • SEO for Mobile Phones
  • Notify Google of mobile sites
  • Guide mobile users accurately
  • Promotions and Analysis
  • Promote your website in the right ways

Some of this is a bit ‘techie’ but so is the Google process. Get your IT team or your Content management System (CMS) provider to show you how these issues have been covered, or not, as the case may be.

Keywords.
Previous thinking on providing information in the keywords tag is a little outdated. Google doesn’t use the keywords in the ‘keywords tag’ to add much, if at all, to your ranking. Is adding keywords of any use ? I would argue it is, because the activity of producing a keyword list for a page generates a lot of words which can be used in the text and used in the page content they do add to the ‘discoverability’ of the page by search engines. Include as many keywords as possible in the body text of your pages as you write them.

Schemas.
Schema is from the Greek meaning ‘shape’ or more generally ‘plan’.  In web site context it relates more to accepted standards. A number of search engines have agreed on schemas which make content appearing on complying web sites more discoverable – even re-usable.

The web site schema.org provides information on standards and practices. This may be one area for the more technically minded in your organisation to look at.

Domain authority:
Is about the “weight” of your site in terms of its authority.

This is related to:-

  • the age of the site – the older it is the greater the authority (especially if it is kept up to date).
  • Quality of links to the site – the more links of better quality i.e. from sites which have some credibility, the greater the authority of the site. In addition if you have a large number of long tail articles ( articles referring to the full range of content on your site) so much the better.However, cheaply written long tail articles about small issues in your long tail – a sort of ‘pulp fiction’ for search engines – a ploy employed by some SEO companies – are frowned upon. Google are looking at how they can overcome this “tweaking”.(This is not really an issue for Local Government sites, most of which are both old and massive, in terms of customer usage largely developed as a result of monopoly supply of these services in their geographic area; but be aware of the issues.)
    Working with partners and stakeholders.
    The production of cheaply written articles designed essentially to dupe Google – mentioned above – is not a feature found in, or about, local government web sites. However it’s true that good articles written about issues in the long tail of LG web sites are seen as positive. You should therefore consider how you work with partners and stakeholders to publish interesting and useful pieces about content on your site.
    Links.
    Links to your site from external sources should not be simply links to the home page. “Deep-linking” – where you provide links to deep areas of your site – is an essential part of customer service, good manners even. How often have you been frustrated by following a provided link only to find you have been dropped at the front page of a site with 20,000 documents and having to search. Grrr… Deep-linking is good for you and the client.

Remember… No links = no ranking. For local government this is relevant if you want to improve visibility of sections deep within your site.

Social media.
Use social media ( you should be anyway. See post about using Twitter here)  Twitter, Facebook, blogs  etc  to send out links to deeper parts of your site.  Using social media raises Google scores as it illustrates a willingness to engage. Evidence of engagement is good for your “Google-life”.
Note.
There is reputed to be a relationship between Facebook and Microsoft hence Google is none too keen on Facebook results. It prefers to add more credence to your name appearing in Twitter – allegedly.

Low quality content on part of the site can affect the whole site.
Look at your site for signs of low quality. Such as:-

  • Not enough content on a page.
  • Poorly written pages – grammar, spelling, readability. (Google checks these elements).
  • Content copied from other sites. (Google say they can see this).
  • Content that isn’t useful – we’ve all produced it; that ego-massaging stuff about “how good we are and what we achieve blather, blather”. Only good for egos. Not at all useful to the client and therefore a negative.

Note.
Google ignores duplicate pages even from different web sites. Google is looking for original, high quality content. Don’t copy content from elsewhere into the pages of your site. It’s OK to cut and paste elements to illustrate a point but don’t cut and paste whole pages or even sections.

Remember.
In Local Government Content is King. I believe local government organisations should place their ever-reducing resources into providing and sharpening up their content. It’s what clients go to local government sites for after all.  And – in the extreme – if that content isn’t there or is weak then what’s the point of the web site?

Another perspective; SEO for companies is far, far more complex.
Whole books and seminars are devoted to those complexities and nuances. There is little point in covering them here.
Here’s why it’s simpler for local government organisations :-

  • Most businesses do not have the benefit of being a monopoly provider.Local Government organisations do.
  • Most businesses do not have the benefit of providing essential services.Local Government organisations do.
  • Most businesses are not talked about by partners and stakeholders as widely. Local Government organisations are.

Consequently SEO for business is a far more complex and time consuming affair. And one on which the economic health of many a company hangs. Appearance in the search engines at high levels can make the difference between getting the business or not and therefore survival or not. That’s why many companies spend millions on improving their Google-life with SEO techniques and Google ads.

Local Government is fortunate not to have this pressure. Nevertheless local government can learn a lot from the application of good search engine optimisation techniques employed by commerce. It’s after all focused on excellence in customer service and shouldn’t local government organisations be striving towards that goal?

About the author.

Peter Barton was the Head of Service for “Web and Information Governance” at Lincolnshire County Council until December 2010.

Peter introduced many innovative elements into Local Government Web sites many of which have since become commonplace. Advertising for instance.

Peter’s background, prior to Local Government web site production  was in commerce where he started and ran a successful design business for many years. Peter has been involved in web site production since 1992 building the first sites in hand written code.

Peter’s business is a commercial venture  in on-line retail. Quite a departure form local government but a departure which has involved learning about the otherwise hidden intricacies of the web again. This time with a commercial eye. What he now has is a commercially augmented experience of local government web production.  And that’s refreshing and useful.

Peter also provides consultancy to Local Government on all things web.

Contact details:

T:  +44 (0) 1522-878135

M: +44 (0) 7712-578596

E: peterdbarton@gmail.com

Skype: V70PDB

Twitter: #lgwebman – Tweets about local government web stuff

The ‘How To’ on social media

Dave Briggs is running an event in May.

If you don’t know about Dave Briggs… where have you been? Dave is a gifted speaker – I had the sinking feeling of following on from him once at conference in Birmingham – and general uber-geek on all things Social media.

Social media. If you want to know what it’s all about, why you should be using it and how it can help you in local government get along to his event. You’ll learn a lot and your council will benefit.

Information here.

Shared Services. A working model?

Local Government is trying to save money as it has never done before. That of course begs the question  – if the services remain viable after all this cutting why was it not done before? I digress.

Some council’s are joining arms; huddling together. They’re forming small circles to defend against the icy blasts of the Cut, Cut, Cutting gales raging through local government land. Within the opportunities that concept presents in sharing services they are trying to discover savings. Savings usually means losing duplication. And to me that means people.

I spoke recently with the manager of one such service on the east coast of England.

East Lindsey and South Holland District Council’s in Lincolnshire have formed a company, Compass Point Business Services Ltd to share back office services. Chaired by one of the Councillors, Cllr P. PRZYSZLAK, this hybrid commercial/local government venture is seeking to offer similar service provision to that provided by Mouchel Business Services, who provide similar services to Lincolnshire County Council. One assumes, because of its symbiotic relationship with local government, Compass Point  Business Services Ltd won’t have quite the same issues with capital and looking for work. Both will be assured I would guess. Not quite a level playing field in terms of supplier equality.

In a conversation with Martin Payne of Compass Point in late January I asked if there was any intention to merge the web sites of both organisation, or at least to merge the provision. It’s early days yet and it looks like the web is a side issue to be dealt with after the back office merging of Revs & Bens has taken place.

Could you tell me a little about Compass point and how it will work with the web provision of both Councils?

Payne “Before Compass Point was formed East Lindsey moved our web site, back in August 2009 I think, from local hosting to being hosted at South Holland. There’s no major work planned at the moment. We’re using an old version of MS CMS and we would be looking to change this at some point in the future.”

How is the shared service working via a private limited company?

Payne. “ We are not a private limited company. We are owned jointly by East Lindsey and South Holland DC’s. It does get confusing when we talk to suppliers about licensing. We are allowed to look for business from other public service entities like other local authorities etc. but we’re very busy trying to merge the 5 services we have done so far.”

Are you looking outside of the County to sell your services?

Payne. “Definitely. Yes.”

Are you not fettered by Political issues?

Payne. “ this has all come about by attempts to save money. The intention is to save £30m but compass point have the ambition to attract business from other parts of the Country. Initially the intention was to include Boston but that didn’t come about. Perhaps that will change in the next 12 months. Our business model is to provide say Revs and Bens to the other districts, Lincoln for example. The ambition is to grow in that market place.”

How does this fit in with the Lincolnshire wide desire to share IT?

Payne. “ I don’t know if we will be seen as the outsiders. I’m not sure what is going to happen. I’m sure Politics will become involved in those decisions”

How many staff went into Compass point?

Payne. “300 staff went into the business and we are now re-structuring down to a figure of nearer 200 long term.”

Early days indeed and Payne went on to say they were frantic at present sorting everything out.

It will be hard to forecast the outcome for this crossbreed. Will it be a cross between a tiger and a lion or simply a mule. Time will tell but in the interim it will be worth watching. From what I am hearing there is some disquiet in the staff who are going, but that’s not just restricted to this type of partnership I guess. Local Government is in a mess all around.

In the meanwhile Lincolnshire County Council are continuing their long term web partnership with West Lindsey and North Kesteven District Councils. That partnership has been in existence for 5 years or more. The partners share the County CMS, some templates and staff work closely together between County and Districts. The partnership has been quietly delivering savings year on year. And in Lincolnshire became an early demonstration of what shared services could look like.

Socitm on the cookie issue

After a couple of calls this week it seems like my recent piece here on cookie-gate wrong footed some folks a tad.

For example, when asked today what Socitm’s view is about cookies on web sites, Martin Greenwood said he was “not sure we (Socitm) have one right now” and that he had “known about it before and I’ve asked one or two people for their opinions, but I don’t’ have an a opinion yet”.

I suppose with ‘Better Connected 2011’ due for imminent publication ( March 1st) he has been busy.  A reasonable excuse for inactivity you may think. The issue is pressing however, as the legislation has the potential to bite chunks out of the business Socitm get from selling their ‘Web site take up service’ which Greenwood agreed uses cookies. Assuming of course they believe they should comply.

One thing is clear though, if Socitm pedal a service to Councils which uses cookies then they aren’t going to be in a rush to criticise you for using cookies on your own sites – until of course they sort the issue out for themselves. And given the level of activity that doesn’t look like any time soon.

In the meanwhile commercial companies who rely on cookies to deliver their business are moving, with commendable alacrity, towards compliance once the interpretation of the law becomes more clear.