FOI requests by Twitter are acceptable according to the ICO.

If you are not responsible for the Twitter Account or FOI in your organisation pass this on to somebody who is.

This follows on from our recent article on Tweeting underlying the growing importance of the new medium to your organisation.

It’s now even more important for public sector organizations to provide a Twitter account.

In July’s newsletter from the Information Commissioner Office 28.7.2011 it’s made clear that it’s permissible for the public to use Twitter for a  Freedom Of Information (FOI) Request.

Even more serious is that it’s permissible to make that request using an @mention as Twitter allows the authority to check for @mentions of itself, and so it has in effect received that request, even though it was not sent directly to the authority like an email or letter.”

What this means is a council’s Twitter account is deemed by the ICO to be a satisfactory communications channel and as such should be monitored and managed. Given the clock starts ticking on the day after such a tweet is put up on Twitter, councils should be monitoring those accounts on a very regular basis if some of the 20 working days allowed are not to be lost. If you don’t check you wont see the FOI come in.

Articles discussing this issue here..

http://blogs.journalism.co.uk/editors/2011/07/29/can-foi-requests-be-submitted-on-twitter-yes-says-ico/

And a contrary view here…

http://davidhiggerson.wordpress.com/2011/08/03/foi-via-a-tweet-a-silly-flight-of-fancy-surely/

No matter what your opinion the ICO has ruled and you are obliged to comply.

Are you Ready?

Peter Barton
Ex Head of Web and Information Governance (Including all things FOI)
Lincolnshire County Council

We’re all useless. The Guardian says so. It’s the silly season.

Guardian piece

Local Government spends far too much on web site design when it could all be done for £15,000. That’s the gist of a couple of conjoined reports from the Telegraph and the Guardian this week here and here.

The Guardian drew these conclusions and figures from a piece of work by a journalist, a “datajournalist” no less, who, after sending an FOI request to all councils, ‘discovered’ councils spend money on talking to their clients via a cheaper  more cost effective channel.

Birmingham, it seems, spent over £2m on their new web site design. By analysing data the Guardian’s researchers deduced it could be done for £15k on average. So why the excessive spend?

I’m not here to defend Birmingham’s spend ( though as a rabid Brummie I have a view) but the set of questions sent out in the FOI was flawed as it allowed folks to provide answers – or not, as the case may be – which made it impossible to compare like with like.

The Guardians conclusions  seemed to depend on how much we each spent on external suppliers. If you didn’t use one then it showed your costs as nil. And if you did… well the slewed results are obvious.
No mention was made, because the question wasn’t asked, of how much was spent internally on staff to design, construct and manage the site (not the content). I heard recently of a council who has 5 full time members of staff working on their site and developing it to meet changing needs. That has to be £125,000 a year in anybody’s money.

Telegraph piece

Telegraph piece

This shows  it’s simply not possible to compare Apples with Apples from the data collected. Comparisons can be made but will be flawed.

It got worse as  inaccuracies in the way the data was used became evident. For Example the data provide by my own council showed a cost of new web site design (one of the questions asked) as being about 18p per head of population. The guardian declared it as being £1.11 per head using  a population of over 1million. We don’t have a population of over a million, let alone that sort of budget. I thought journalists, especially data ones, checked their facts. To get the facts wrong and then to compound that with arithmetical errors is simply sloppy. All they had to do was divide the amount of spend by the population.

Our comm’s department complained to the Guardian so they corrected the offending figure. To £18.20. What!

Our comm’s department complained again and this time the Guardian, after much red faced appologies, got it right. I wonder how much of the manipulation of others data was similarly mishandled?

I’m not against FOI requests per se. They do lend a transparency to the processes in Local Government which should be welcomed but when they are used in such a confusing, dogmatic, and yet, inept manner I find it difficult to defend their use; and indeed defend the masses of time spent on making the replies.

Looking at the gaps in the Guardian’s listings; surely the real story is how many Local Authorities didn’t answer the FOI at all. That would be 96%.  No.09%. Argh… I give up. I’ll leave you to work it out for yourself in true Guardian style.

One comment on the Guardian page seems to grasp the issues we face

…………………………………………………………………………………..

pauldjones

17 Aug 2010, 12:58PM
This information is not only wrong, it is very missleading – the results of FOI questions that were not specific and the answers to which have been adapted and false representation has resulted in wrong details being printed.

Local authorities have to follow very strict rules on use and access to all, accessability guidelines are among the toughest in the world in the UK for authorities.

To display the hoem made site for Birmingham council as being cheaper and better value is wrong, a simple look at the site shows errors all over, a poor amaturish look and not developer skill anywhere. There is no usability, accessability or user experience considerations at all…
The site has 3 errors making this site at present illegal under DDA laws and would be served a 90 day penalty notice to close. Newspapers seem to liek to glamorise facts and figures, but the wrong ones.

As a designer/developer I am fully aware of these laws and considerations that MUST be taken daily by LA web staff.

Local Authority websitea have the widest target audience anywhere – everyone!
The laws in place make it a requirement to develop and redesign sites on average every 3 years -this is never mentioned!

Why not print the truth and the reallity of this?

…………………………………………………………………………………

I have only a miniscule amount of knowledge of publisher  websites but from the little I know perhaps I could suggest these journalists discover how much their own sites cost to design construct and manage before taking a shot at a sector which probably ‘talks’ meaningfully  to more people on a daily basis than the whole of the sites in the newspaper sector. If they were to do that they may begin to put local government spending on web sites into perspective, but of course that wouldn’t sell newspapers.

Lets turn off the web

p.s for a considered look at how spending on Local Government web sites benefits councils and their clients  take a look here.

FOI watch now active.



All local authorities receive freedom of information  requests (FOI’s) and whilst not many relate to the provision of the council web sites when they do come in they can be quite complex. And generally these FOI’s are sent to many organisations.

The FOI watch list in the tabs above is a simple listing of FOI’s relevant to Council web sites that have been received recently.

If you have received an FOI which isn’t there then upload yours for others to see what they may be having to answer soon.